• NEW DELHI
  • CHENNAI
  • MUMBAI
IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
NEW DELHI
1 OCTOBER 2022
Registrations Closed
CHENNAI
15 OCTOBER 2022
Registrations Closed
MUMBAI
5 NOVEMBER 2022
Registrations Closed
WHY A DESIGN JAM?
It’s a unique event that uses design thinking to enable creatives, experts and citizens to come together and find solutions to the climate problems of their city. The key problem statements will be built in consultation with partners so that a city’s key concerns are addressed. Participants will be tasked with creating some form of outcome in whatever format they choose, while using the themes and problem statement allotted to them under the guidance of a mentor (an expert from the problem area) within the duration of the jam. After this gathering, processes and results are shared at a local, national and global level [COP27] so that communities can build upon each other’s work.
NEW DELHI EDITION
1 OCTOBER 2022
MENTORS
Ritika Kapoor, Researcher, Climate Trends
Delhiites experience the severity of heat waves which affect public health, especially among vulnerable age groups and outdoors workers
Harsimran Kaur, Associate Researcher, International Council on Clean Transportation
As Delhi’s population continues to expand, the city sees more people shift to private modes of transport, further adding to traffic jams and congestion.
Anthony Lopez, Founder and Principal Designer, Lopez Designs
Delhi-NCR witnesses a sharp rise in extreme rainfall in a short duration, which causes urban flooding and water-logging and results in huge physical and economic damage.
Charve Jain, Vice President, Vardhman Estates
Citizens of Delhi continue to breathe in toxic levels of air pollution, caused mostly due to urbanisation, population growth, increased vehicle ownership, growing energy demand and proximity to industrial hubs.
Prof KT Ravindran, Member-Governing Council, INTACH
Uneven monsoon behaviour, extreme heat waves and exploitation of ground water adding to the capital’s water woes is a ‘New Normal’ that needs immediate attention.
Teams
Team 1: Heatwaves
Mentor: Ritika Kapoor, Researcher, Climate Trends
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Team 2: Urban Mobility
Mentor: Harsimran Kaur, Associate Researcher, International Council on Clean Transportation
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Team 3: Urban Flooding
Mentor: Anthony Lopez, Founder and Principal Designer, Lopez Designs
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Team 4: Air Pollution
Mentor: Charve Jain, vice president, Vardhman Estates
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Team 5: Water Crisis
Mentor: Prof KT Ravindran, Member-Governing Council, INTACH
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  • Chennai EDITION
    1 OCTOBER 2022
    MENTORS
    Prof Janakrajan, President, South Asia Consortium for InterdisciplinaryWater Resources Studies (SaciWATERs)
    Problems with Chennai’s rivers, plagued by rampant pollution and overdevelopment, are only amplified by climate change and will continue to be so in the coming years. Flood situation is likely to intensify as the city is also seeing a rise in sea level at the rate of 0.33 mm per year.
    Aishwarya Soni, Deputy Manager—Strategic & Visual Communications, ITDP India
    With an ever-increasing population, estimated to be 9.8 million in 2015, Chennai’s urban transport facilities are under immense pressure.
    Parvathi Nayar, Artist, Writer and Poet
    In 2019 Chennai hit the headlines for being one of the first major cities in the world to run out of water—trucking in 10 million litres a day to hydrate its population. Climate change and poor urban planning has been held responsible for Chennai’s water woes.
    Anupama Mohanram. Co-founder & Head – Architecture, Green Evolution
    In the summer of 2022, Chennai consumed 25% of the overall power demand in Tamil Nadu, marking about 5% increase from the earlier seasons. Chennai’s power demand is around 3,500 MW, which is more or less equal to the entire Kerala state’s demand!
    Sudheendra NK, director, Madras Terrace Architectural Works and founder 1000Tanks
    While the number of heatwaves have been higher in Delhi and Kolkata in the last 30 years, but the risk of extreme heat stress and dangerous heat strokes triggered by relative humidity is highest in Chennai.
    Teams
    Team 1: River Encroachment and Urban Flooding
    Mentor: Prof Janakrajan, President, (SaciWATERs)
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    Team 2: Urban Mobility
    Mentor: Aishwarya Soni, Deputy Manager—Strategic & Visual Communications, ITDP India
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    Team 3: Water Crisis
    Mentor: Parvathi Nayar, Artist, Writer and Poet
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    Team 4: Energy Crisis
    Mentor: Anupama Mohanram. Co-founder & Head – Architecture, Green Evolution
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    Team 5: Heatwaves and Wet Bulb Temperature
    Mentor: Sudheendra NK, director, Madras Terrace Architectural Works and founder 1000Tanks
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  • Mumbai EDITION
    5 NOVEMBER 2022
    MENTORS
    Siddharth Singh, Energy, Climate and Mobility expert
    Mumbai is the most congested city in India with more cars per kilometre of road than anywhere else in the country. Over the last two decades, Mumbai has seen a whopping 200% rise in private vehicles. As a result, vehicles spend about 65% of their time stuck in congestion. With the highest congestion rates in India and problems with pollution, Mumbai needs to seriously rethink its transport network
    Rajkumar Sharma, founder, ALMANAC (Advanced Locality Management and Networking Action Committee)
    Mumbai generates waste to the tune of approximately 7,025 tonnes per day. Less than 10% of this waste is segregated and even lesser is actually treated. Improper waste management creates air, soil and water pollution and mixed waste is either sent to dumping grounds or burnt.
    Kartiki Naik, Programme Manager- Urban Mobility, WRI
    IThe accelerated sea-level rise can compound coastal flooding. Stressing that Mumbai is at a high risk of severe flooding and sea-level rise, the UN report stated that the resulting damage in the state capital might even go up Rs 12,082 crore annually by 2050.
    Farah Kazi, Strategic Communications Consultant, Respirer Living Sciences
    While much focus is given to North India’s air pollution crisis, should Mumbai wait till there is a health emergency to act on its rising air pollution levels? Traffic emissions, construction operations, paved and unpaved road dust, landfills, open rubbish burning, and industrial emissions are among the major sources of pollution in the financial capital of India.
    Pranita Lakhe, deputy planner, CIDCO
    Critical properties and road networks in Mumbai will be submerged by 2050. Mumbai’s infrastructure will begin to crumble slowly as we inch closer into the future. How Mumbai’s infrastructure evolves over the next 10 years may be a major determinant of the impact of climate change on the city’s residents.
    Teams
    Team 1: Urban Mobility
    Mentor: Siddharth Singh, Energy, Climate and Mobility expert
    Team 2: Solid Waste Management
    Mentor: Rajkumar Sharma, founder, ALMANAC (Advanced Locality Management and Networking Action Committee)
    Team 3: Urban flooding and sea level rise
    Mentor: Kartiki Naik, Programme Manager- Urban Mobility, WRI
    Team 4: Air Pollution
    Mentor: Farah Kazi, Strategic Communications Consultant, Respirer Living Sciences
    Team 5: Infrastructure loss & damage
    Mentor: Pranita Lakhe, deputy planner, CIDCO
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  • The Future of our Cities
    What will your city look like in the year 2050? What sustainable solutions does Delhi, Chennai and Mumbai need to breathe clean air? Find the future of our cities unlocked in this series with innovative solutions crafted by citizens.