03 Dec 2023
Historic Health Declaration Signed at COP28
On day 3 of COP28, nations signed a new declaration on climate and health, while they also took technology into account, and its crucial role in climate action. This was the first time a health day was dedicated at COP. The declaration announced $1 billion for climate and health. The announcement of $1 billion for […]

On day 3 of COP28, nations signed a new declaration on climate and health, while they also took technology into account, and its crucial role in climate action. This was the first time a health day was dedicated at COP. The declaration announced $1 billion for climate and health.

The announcement of $1 billion for climate and health and the launch of a declaration to accelerate actions to protect people’s health from growing climate impacts headlined the third day COP28 as the Presidency spotlighted health for the first time in the history of the UN Climate Change Conference.

The World Health Organisation welcomed the historic declaration, which aims to protect people from climate change and impact on their health, and strengthen the current healthcare sector around the world. 

Various stakeholders including governments, development banks, multilateral institutions, philanthropies, and NGOs have shown their commitment to increase their investment in climate and health solutions.

What Is The Declaration

The historic declaration, which was tabled a day before the world health day at COP28 in Dubai,  developed with the support of a number of ‘country champions’ including Brazil, Malawi, the UK, the US, the Netherlands, Kenya, Fiji, India, Egypt, Sierra Leone, and Germany.

The Declaration covers a range of action areas at the nexus of climate and health. It emphasises on revamping the health systems capable of handling climate-related challenges. It also highlights the need to strengthen the cross-sectoral collaboration to reduce emissions. Apart from this, the declaration also  emphasises on getting the most health benefits from actions taken to tackle climate problems. Lastly, it says we should put more money into solutions that help both the environment and our health.

According to WHO the climate crisis is resulting in extreme weather that is taking lives around the world. It also points that the same emissions that are warming our planet are also poisoning the air we breathe.

As per the WHO data, air pollution kills some seven million people worldwide every year, while millions of people are exposed to extreme weather-related events each year.

“The impacts of climate change are already at our door. They have become one of the greatest threats to human health in the 21st century. Governments have now rightly recognised health as a crucial element of climate action” said COP28 President Dr Sultan Al Jaber.

What Is The Role Of Technology In Health

There was also the on ‘Green Digital Action,’ led by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Where the important role digital technologies can play while dealing with climate change was highlighted. These technologies help monitor the climate, make us stronger against climate changes, and set up early warning systems. They’re also key in efforts to lessen the impact, like making things more energy-efficient, building eco-friendly networks, and aiding the shift to a greener economy. “COP28 is a chance to show how digital action can help fight climate change and push for reducing the environmental impact of tech. The goal is to limit temperature increases to 1.5°C”, said the ITU Secretary-General.

Also Read: Why Global South Matters

What Are The New Financing Principles

Several significant organisations including the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, the Green Climate Fund, The Rockefeller Foundation, and the WHO came together with the COP28 Presidency to introduce ten principles aimed at strengthening funding for climate and health. 

These principles focus on getting more financing, encouraging innovation, and adopting new approaches for transformative projects that address both climate and health issues. Supported by over 40 financial partners and civil society groups, these principles reflect a growing collaboration among funders to sustainably support solutions for climate and health. 

The COP28 Presidency acknowledged that tackling the health impacts of climate change requires action across society, including swift and significant efforts to cut emissions by at least 43% in the next seven years. 

The declaration signifies a commitment to address health impacts beyond the health sector and involve various other sectors in order to achieve climate action.

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