SUSTAINABLE FASHION – Fashion for the Future


Sustainable Fashion has become a buzz word recently. It literally means ‘thinking first and buying later’ and also asking yourself if you are really going to wear that new piece to the extent that it was worth being made! 

Sustainable fashion is not only about producing clothes which are environment-friendly, but also about sustainable patterns of consumption.

Fashion Industry is choking the environment

In the middle of a severe climate crisis, the fashion industry is one of the biggest polluters. The production and distribution of fibers and garments used in fashion all contribute to differing forms of environmental pollution, including water, air, and soil pollution.

Each year, the clothing that is simply thrown away amounts to about 11 million tons in the US alone.

Moreover, according to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), the USD 2.5 trillion fashion industry has become one of the largest users of water globally producing 20 percent of global water waste.

Additionally, the fashion industry’s carbon dioxide emissions are projected to increase by more than 60 percent to nearly 2.8 billion tons per year by 2030.

Turning to sustainable fashion is the only option we have!

Let Me Breathe × Shuffling Suitcases

Let Me Breathe recently partnered with Shuffling Suitcases, a curated pop up for ethical, slow fashion brands. 

Curated by ethical fashion influencer Devyani Kapoor, Shuffling Suitcases collaborated with Pernia’s Pop Up Shop for a Conscious Festive Edit from 18 October to 20 October 2019 for the cause of sustainability where ethical and sustainable brands from across the country were invited to participate, share their stories and passion with the world and put a brighter spotlight on their products. 

Likhawat

“All of us here, who are into sustainability, focus a lot on not following the trends. The trends will gradually fade but what we are doing is evergreen”, says Devyani Kapoor

Coming together for the Cause of Sustainability 

The Edit focused on taking the narrative of sustainability and circular fashion forward along with empowering artisans and ensuring the trickle down of financial benefits to kaarigars. 

Ikkudi

Over twenty ethical and sustainable brands from all across the country participated in the Conscious Festive Edit. 

The brands are Me Meraki, Three Sisters, Vaaya, Aroka, Sabi, Parikatha, 1708, Caffeinated, Iddika, Armateur, Khyati, Nathwani, Shibui, Likhawat, Cross A Line, Sneha Arjun, Aslee, Pozruh, Ikkudi, Bhavik shah and Boondh

These brands work directly with skilled artisans, weavers and weaving clusters of India giving them employment opportunities and fair wages. 

The featured brands also work with planet positive techniques of production and even use natural fibres like hemp and bamboo ensure no harm is being caused to the environment while creating the pieces of art.

Amrita Neelakantan, founder of Black Orchid, a sustainable clothing brand said, “I have the choice of picking up something that makes me feel good, feels good on my body, doesn’t harm someone’s income and the environment. These all can be achieved by picking up something sustainable rather than clothes which don’t feel good on the body.”

Shweta Agarwal, too runs a sustainable brand called Aroka with her husband. They both work with different communities every month and try to uplift and educate them about marketing. 

Zoya Wahi who runs ‘Aslee’ works with new kind of fabrics that are more in the sustainable space and traditional.  Her aim is to locate fabrics and fibers that are more sustainable and can generally go to everyday lifestyle and will last for a while.

“Sustainability for me is improving all of the stages of the product’s life cycle. Basically, from something that doesn’t harm the environment, doesn’t harm the income of the artists, and taking care of everything.” said Jyotsna, founder of Vaaya.

Apart from discussing about Sustainable fashion, free workshops were also conducted during the Festive edit, so that people understand the need for a transition to a slow lifestyle as they shop.

Black Orchid

(This is the first part of the series on Sustainability and Fashion)


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Lmb Staff

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